Communication

Communication

 

About communication and ASD

Communication is often a significant area of difficulty for children with ASD. Some children may experience delays in verbal language, while others may never fully develop a functional use of verbal language.

Verbal language is only a small component of communication, and gestures, cues, tone and facial expressions are equally important to consider and use when communicating.

Each child will respond differently to different styles of communication, and finding the appropriate means of communication for each child is vital in helping them to reach their full potential.

 

Why do we need to develop and optimise communication in children with ASD in playgroup?

 

Children who have impaired communication skills are at risk of being socially isolated and missing out on learning opportunities that occur naturally through play and interaction with others. In order to improve opportunities for play and socialisation, it is vital to find the most effective methods of communication that work for each child.

Children who have difficulty processing the language and communication of others may find it hard to follow group routines and activities and can become stressed and anxious as a result.

The different forms of communication that children use will vary between individuals and are often subtle and easily missed. It is important to try to understand and encourage all attempts to communicate.

 

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    Sometimes children may use words or phrases that can be a little unusual. In this section we explain why they sometimes use language that seems out of context, and how you can try to help them use the right expressions to make themselves understood.

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